Practice Areas

Boston Employment Immigration Attorney

At Watson Law Offices, our success in representing clients in immigration applications is based on attorney Roy Jack Watson, Jr.’s analytic approach to the practice of immigration law. Many firms view immigration representation as the process of filling out forms. Mr. Watson views a visa application as a problem-solving exercise. He assesses each client’s goals thoroughly and develops a sound strategy for overcoming any obstacles in the way of attaining them.

More information on our immigration law practice:

For more information, or to schedule a consultation with our attorney, please contact our Boston office.

Employment-based immigrant visas (aka green cards or lawful permanent residence) allow the holder and the holder's spouse and children to live and work anywhere in the United States permanently. Since the process of obtaining a green card can take many years (depending on the category and in some cases even your country of birth), it is best to first obtain a temporary employment-based visa, which allows the holder to work lawfully in the U.S. while waiting for approval of the employment-based immigration visa. Permanent resident status does not entitle the holder to vote and the holder will not receive top security clearance. The Employment Based (EB) immigrant visa categories are as follows:
  • EB-1: Persons of extraordinary ability in the sciences, arts, education, business, or athletics; outstanding professors or researchers; and multinational executives and managers.
  • EB-2: Persons who are members of the professions holding advanced degrees or for persons with exceptional ability in the arts, sciences, or business.
  • EB-3: Professionals, skilled workers, and other workers.
  • EB-4: “Special immigrants,” which includes certain religious workers, employees of U.S. foreign service posts, retired employees of international organizations, alien minors who are wards of courts in the United States, and other classes of aliens.
  • EB-5: Business investors who invest $1 million (or $500,000 in a targeted employment area) in a new commercial enterprise that employs at least 10 full-time U.S. workers.
For more information, or to schedule a consultation, please contact our office.
Many people get Green Cards (become permanent residents) through family members. You may be eligible to get a Green Card as:
  • an immediate relative of a U.S. citizenthis includes spouses, unmarried children under the age of 21, and parents of U.S. citizen petitioners 21 or older
  • a family member of a U.S. citizen fitting into a preference categorythis includes unmarried sons or daughters over the age of 21, married children of any age, and brothers and sisters of U.S. citizen petitioners 21 or older
  • a family member of a green card holderthis includes spouses and unmarried children of the sponsoring green card holder
  • a member of a special categorythis can include battered spouse or child (VAWA), a K nonimmigrant, a person born to a foreign diplomat in the United States, a V nonimmigrant or a widow(er) of a U.S. Citizen
There is an unlimited amount of visas available for spouses, parents, and children (under 21) of US citizens; however, there are limited visas available for siblings and children over 21 of US citizens, as well as spouses and children of permanent residents. In the limited visa categories, there are often wait lists of many years. You can check wait times on the US State Department's monthly Visa Bulletin. For more information or to schedule a consultation, contact our office.
The Immigrant Investor Program (EB-5) was created to stimulate the U.S. economy through job creation and capital investment by foreign investors. The minimum required amount to invest is $1 Million, (or $500,000 for a project in a "Targeted Employment Area"). After two years, an EB-5 project must show that it has created at least 10 full-time jobs for US workers in order for the investor to qualify for a green card. There are two options for EB-5 programs:
  • Alien Entrepreneur program: the foreign national invests in and actively manages his or her own business, provided he or she can prove it meets EB-5 requirements.
  • Regional Center program: the foreign national invests in a designated Regional Center, which has already been approved by the government for purposes of the EB-5 program. There are many Regional Center programs set up throughout the country from which to choose. In a Regional Center project, the investor does not need to take an active role in the project. Check USCIS's website for a list of approved Regional Centers.
For more information, or to schedule a consultation with our attorney, please contact our office.
The reunification of families still accounts for the majority of immigrant visas (green cards) issued each year in the US.  There is an unlimited amount of visas available for spouses, parents, and children (under 21) of US citizens; however, there are limited visas available for siblings and children over 21 of US citizens, as well as spouses and children of permanent residents. In the limited visa categories, there are often wait lists of many years. You can check wait times on the US State Department's monthly Visa Bulletin. For more information, or to schedule a consultation with experienced immigration lawyer Roy Jack Watson, Jr., please contact our office.